Are hockey skates ever comfortable?

You might even wonder if the players ever get comfortable in their hockey skates. Hockey skates can be uncomfortable for a number of reasons. It is entirely normal for new hockey skates to be uncomfortable when they are new; breaking the skates in is necessary to reduce pain.

Can hockey skates be comfortable?

It is easy to assume that because performance skates need that stiffness to help you manoeuvre, that hockey skates are just meant to be uncomfortable. That is not true. A quality skate, complete with great padding, an appropriate outsole, and even a reliable boot, can easily be comfortable as well as functional.

Are hockey skates supposed to hurt?

When you first skate in your new skates, yes, it is normal for there to be a little discomfort. It is normal to get the odd blister, or a bit of a pain. This discomfort should only affect you the first few times you use your skates. This is the normal process of breaking in a new pair of skates.

How should hockey skates feel?

Hockey skates should be snug, but not uncomfortably tight. When unlaced, your toes should just barely touch the toe cap. When standing in your skates with them fully laced, you want your heel snug in the heel pocket, so your toes have a bit of space at the end.

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Why are hockey skates uncomfortable?

One of the biggest causes for uncomfortable hockey skates comes from them not being broken in. When you first get a pair of hockey skates, they will be very stiff and tight. In a way, this is a good thing because it allows the skates to form to your foot as they break-in.

Can hockey skates be too stiff?

If you skate for many hours a day, under the same grueling conditions as do pros, ultra stiff skates could be in order. Pros break in (and down) their skates quickly. They need very stiff skates so that they won’t have to break in several pairs during one hockey season.

How long do hockey skates take to break in?

How long does it take to break in ice skates? The amount of time it takes to break in ice skates can vary, but it’s usually between 6-10 hours of ice time. Heat moulding or baking your skates often helps to shorten this break-in period.

Do pro hockey players wear socks?

Are skate socks necessary to play hockey? Absolutely not! Many players, including myself, go barefoot in their skates for a variety of reasons. I choose not to wear skate socks because I like my skates to fit as tight as possible.

Why do my hockey skates hurt my ankles?

What is lace bite? Lace bite is the result of irritation on the front part of the ankle due to pressure from shoelaces and a shoe or skate’s tongue. The condition is usually a progressive one — the more you wear the shoes or skates, the more intense the pain or discomfort grows.

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Can you remold hockey skates?

Heat molding or baking your new hockey skates is a way to help break them in faster so they’ll hurt less and fit your foot better. Some hockey players choose to heat mold their skates at home in the oven, and others take them to a pro shop.

Do hockey skates fit like shoes?

A proper fit for hockey skates should fit 1-1.5 sizes smaller than your street shoes. … Your toes should barely touch the toe cap, while having no more than 1/4 inch of space in the heel. When you’re finished lacing up your skates, they should feel snug with the foot resting flat on the footbed.

How stiff should hockey skates be?

In the shop, skates should feel snug, but not painful. Some room for the feet to grow is fine but going 1.5-2 sizes up for the skate “to be good next season” will make your kid miserable and jeopardize his/her learning.

Why do the bottom of my feet hurt when ice skating?

Plantar fasciitis — Plantar fasciitis occurs due to repetitive stress on the bottom of the feet, stretching from the heel towards the toes. It causes pain in the heel and arch, and is common in skateboarders due to intense gripping motion of the toes while skating and poor calf strength or flexibility.